Posts Tagged ‘dog lovers blog’

DOGS HAVE FEELINGS TOO!

Sunday, February 7th, 2016

puppy running  .Hi, Ms. Spunky here.

I want to talk to you about doggie feelings.

Dogs have feelings?  Of course they do.

Plus we not only understand our own feelings we also understand yours!

When Dr. Richards is sad, I put a paw on her leg or nuzzle my nose against her arm. I might even hop into her lap. Dr. Richards has always known that I know when she needs some extra love, but recently she actually found an article that tells her why. Researchers in Hungary have confirmed that canines understand humans’ feelings. They trained a dozen brave dogs to sit still long enough to be placed in an MRI scanner – personally, I start to wiggle just thinking about it – but these dogs tolerated it and the scientists discovered how similar a dog’s brain is to that of a human.

While the dogs were in the scanner, they listened to 200 everyday people noises as well as noise made by dogs. The scientists then looked at what parts of their brains lit up. Apparently, a little patch of our brains is devoted to figuring out emotions. The dogs’ brains light up when they hear happy barks or giggles and it doesn’t respond to sad growls or whines. 

They then put headphones on each dog and let them listen to three types of sounds: human voices, dog sounds and environmental noises, such as a hammer hitting a nail or a phone ringing. The team then looked to see which parts of the brain responded.

Just like humans, the dogs have a little patch of neurons that light up when they hear voices of their own species — other dogs barking, growling or whining. Plus they also have a region located in the same place as people (near the ears) that is sensitive to emotional tones in both human and dog voices.

No wonder Dr. Richards and I love each other so much. I bet our brains light up at the same time! Plus a good doggie detective like me knows a person’s voice tone might just be the final clue that breask a case wide open.

Details of the study were published in the journal Current Biology in February 2014. You can also watch a video of the dogs in the scanner.

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Volunteer with Your Pet: Charity Runs, Pet Therapy, More

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

photo of a therapy dog Ms. Spunky here. We all know that a pet brings you joy and enriches your life. So can volunteering. Think what can happen when they are combined!

I absolutely love volunteering with my human. Recently, we’ve been exploring new opportunities for pets to get involved with helping others. Whether your furry companions participate in a charity walk, visit hospital patients, or donate blood, one thing is for sure, with a little help from you, we can make another person’s day better.

Here are five simple ways you can volunteer with your pet. (more…)

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10 Ways to Tell You’re a Dog Lover

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

dog lover Dogs are man’s best friend for quite a few reasons. These are loyal companions who love you unconditionally. Doesn’t matter how angry your partner is with you, if you come home to a house with a dog, there is always somebody happy to see you. Is someone in your life feeling sad? Show them a picture of a few fluffy puppies and problem solved! Messy, dirty, sloppy and drooly canines are much loved by all, but some of us take it to a whole new level. Here are ten ways to determine if you are one of those people. (more…)

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Calcium Sources for Dogs + Why Dogs Need Calcium

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

puppy running As we age, we learn about a number of medical conditions that occur because of the aging process. Perhaps the one that receives the most publicity is osteoporosis, the chronic and painful disease that afflicts our bones and joints. The same degeneration of bones and joints occurs during the canine aging process and, as with humans, dogs can slow or eliminate the degeneration by supplementing their diets with healthy amounts of calcium. (more…)

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